Russian Burger King Employee Forces Messy Kids to Mop the Floor

Russian fast food workers—as well as baristas, shop owners, and flight attendants—have been known to be notoriously surly to customers, although most seem to stop before they physically assault someone.

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Sep 12 2016, 5:00pm

Hakan Dahlstrom Fotoblogg / Photo Blog

Burger King started using its familiar "Have It Your Way" slogan in 1974, and more than 40 years later, one kid learned that there are limits to what "your way" means. When one Russian teenager decided that "his way" involved making a mess with the soda fountain, a Burger King employee reportedly slapped him in the face and forced him to mop the floor.

A video clip of the encounter was posted on Reddit under the extraordinarily accurate heading "Russian Burger King Don't Fuck Around." A Redditor named Alex_York translated the conversation in the video, and it reads like rejected dialogue from an After-School Special, St. Petersburg edition.

"I'll call my dad," the teen threatens, when the Burger King worker first tells him to take the mop. "He will come here and you will be put in jail." The worker continues to tell him to clean up, the kid says, "I won't!" and the worker, who obviously ran out of fucks to give during his last shift, responds by slapping him.

After that, the kid starts shoving the mop across the tile. When his friends start to laugh, the worker turns his attention to their table and decides that they need a lesson in respect too. "You think you're better than him," he asks a kid who's too old to be wearing a cardboard BK crown. "Clean up."

The second kid is forced to take the mop, and the Burger King worker returns to his shift, where he'll either be asked to turn in his name tag and embroidered polo, or he'll be named Employee of the Century.

Russian fast food workers—as well as baristas, shop owners, and flight attendants—have been known to be notoriously surly to customers, although most seem to stop before they physically assault someone. In 2013, the New York Times reported that many companies, including McDonald's, T.G.I. Friday's and Costa Coffee, were making concerted efforts to train their Russian employees on how to be more friendly and tolerant. "A pretense of friendship with strangers for commercial reasons was not a part of Russian culture before," reporter Andrew Kramer wrote.

According to the Moscow Times, in the 1990s, McDonald's locations in Russia actually had a "smile" listed on the menu, and each smile was provided free of charge. Burger King's complimentary slap in the face seems to be a Secret Menu item but, thanks to that kid, at least we now know how to order it.