Shells

Technology

Crab Shells Could Become the Plastic of the Future

Researchers have found that instead of going into the garbage, crab shells could be going into a new form of biodegradable packaging.
Lauren Rothman
7.26.18
nature

Crab and Shrimp Shells Could Be Used to Make Battery Parts of the Future

Scientists building new materials are looking to nature for inspiration.
Kate Lunau
8.24.16
Science

The World’s Tiniest Snail Is Microcute

Acmella nana measures only half a millimeter wide and about 0.70 millimeters high.
Becky Ferreira
11.2.15
Europe

How Shells From World War I May Be Contaminating Food in Northern France Today

Officials have discovered that land now used to grow crops was used a century ago to dismantle more than 1.5 million shells, which contaminated the soil.
Lucie Aubourg
9.22.15
seafood

Maine Fishermen Want You to Consider the Lesser-Loved Lobsters

Once considered sea trash, lobsters now enjoy a position as a bona fide luxury item. But lobstermen hope to rebrand them yet again to teach us to love "shedders."
Hilary Pollack
6.15.15
Photos

UV Light and Photoshop Return Color to 6 Million Year-Old Seashells

A researcher discovered 13 new species of sea snail using some clever photography.
Jason Koebler
4.2.15
The Building Blocks of Everything

Snail Shells Are Inspiring Tomorrow's Toughest Materials

Abalone shells combine the strength of glass with the toughness of plastic, and they've fascinated biologists and engineers for decades.
Stephen Buranyi
3.12.15
africa

UN Peacekeeper Among Three Killed in Rocket Attack on Base in Northern Mali

Unknown attackers showered a UN base with 30 shells Sunday in the latest attack against foreign forces stationed in the West African nation.
Liz Fields
3.8.15
Islamic State

Syrian Kurds Battle Advancing Islamic State for Strategic Town

Kurdish militiamen and US-led airstrikes have struggled to repel an intense Islamic State offensive around Kobane, near the Turkish border.
Liz Fields
10.5.14
Tasmania

Fancy Oysters are Fighting Tasmanian River Pollution

Oysters have long been lauded for their ability to get your pants off, but the salty little bivalves are more than just an aphrodisiac: They're also being used to filter heavy metals out of Tasmania's long-polluted Derwent River.
Mitch Parker
5.12.14