Entertainment

This Guy Saved a Woman's Life with CPR He Learned from 'The Office'

"I’ve never prepared myself for CPR in my life. I had no idea what I was doing."

by River Donaghey
Jan 28 2019, 5:25pm

Screenshot via NBC

The Office is full of important life lessons—how to be a good boss and a good partner and which seat in the car is the safest, among others—but it turns out there's one episode of the series that apparently contains some honest-to-god, life-saving stuff: the one with the CPR training. The exercise might have dissolved into total mayhem in the episode, but apparently, the CPR instructor's failed attempts at teaching the employees at Dunder-Mifflin rubbed off on at least one viewer: an Arizona man who helped save a woman's life with CPR he learned from Michael Scott.

According to the Arizona Daily Star, earlier this month, 21-year-old Cross Scott was driving past a white sedan parked on the side of the road with its hazard lights on. Thinking someone was having car trouble, Scott decided to stop and try to help—and that's when he found an unconscious woman behind the wheel of the car, whose face was turning blue from lack of oxygen.

He tried to wake the woman by knocking on the car window, but she didn't respond. He smashed the window, climbed inside to help, and quickly realized what she needed was CPR—but he had no clue what that entailed.

"I’ve never prepared myself for CPR in my life," Scott told the Star. "I had no idea what I was doing." Suddenly, Scott remembered Michael Scott doing chest compressions on a CPR dummy to the beat of the Bee Gees's "Stayin' Alive," so that's what he did, too. After 60 terrifying seconds of compressions, the woman came to and started breathing again. By that point, a few other motorists had also stopped and called the paramedics, who arrived at the scene a few minutes later. Emergency responders said Scott's CPR might have helped save the woman's life, he told the Star.

There's still no word on whether that long-rumored Office reboot will ever become a reality, but let's hope it does—the world could probably use some episodes about the Heimlich maneuver and how to properly tie a tourniquet or whatever.

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